“Unschool” School Days

During this week, from Tuesday through Thursday, the whole Innovation lab team and I had three unschool school days. Throughout these three school days, the only innovation lab teacher we had around was Mrs. Shaw,  All of my other regular subject class teachers, Ms. Hawes, Mr. Belanger, Mr. Walach, and Dr. Goldin left for a Deeper Learning program in San Diego California. During these three “unschool” days,  we weren’t doing our regular innovation lab learning about the cold war foreign policy or working on our Fahrenheit 451 essay revisions. Instead, we had a new project where we learned about each and every person in Innovation lab. We learned about communism in North Korea from Mr. Shopick, we watched a movie called ‘sweet fifteen’ and we watched a science documentary called ‘power surge’.

During the “unschool” school days I really found Mr. Shopick’s presentation about his time in North Korea interesting. He described how many little kids wanted to have him take their picture. Afterward, they held up their hands asking for something and Mr. Shopick assumed that they were asking for the printed picture but it was a digital camera. In North Korea, they don’t have printed pictures or printed anything so that might’ve been the reason why the kids wanted a photo. Mr. Shopick also explained how some little kids were asking him something but he didn’t understand so he grabbed his tour guide for assistance. The tour guide told him that they were asking where he’s from and when he said the United States the kids ran in the other direction from him. Lastly, he told us about how he and his group and tour guide passed by a few people cutting grass with scissors with two guards watching them. I thought this presentation was intriguing but also very sad because of the large amount of communism in North Korea. He wasn’t allowed to take a picture of them cutting the grass because North Korea is one of the world’s most secretive societies. Another thing that we did during the “unschool” school days was the ‘Diversity project’. The goal of this project was for everyone to bring in a visual that represented one side of their heritage (from mother or father) and a platter of food that connected to it. This heritage day took place on Thursday, the last school day before leaving for the weekend.

Another thing that we did during the “unschool” school days was the ‘Diversity project’. The goal of this project was for everyone to bring in a visual that represented one side of their heritage (from mother or father) and a platter of food that connected to it. This heritage day took place on Thursday, the last school day before leaving for the weekend.

Between my mother who was born in Brazil and my father who was born in Boston (I am as well) I decided to do the heritage project to my Brazilian background. I brought in a photo of my family and I in Brazil during my 2-year-old birthday party. In front of me were many different kinds of Brazilian delicacies but many of the sweets in front of me were brigadeiro’s. So that’s what I decided to bring.

Brigadeiros are basically small chocolate, condensed milk balls which are very very tasty. Some people may like the flavor and some people might not but to me, it is one of my favorite sweets. In my mom’s side of the family I am very very close with them. My family from brazil (cousins, aunts, uncles, grandmother) often come to the United States to visit. My mom, my sister, my dad and I also go to Brazil a lot as well which is very important. Family means everything to me, and I don’t know what I would do without family. Even though I am more close with my Mom’s side of the family, being born in Boston, and being from Boston has made a large impact on my life. I have many memories there and In my future, I would hopefully like to live their again.

 

Here are some photos of my family and I (when I was younger):

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My Mom, Dad and I.
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My Dad and I at my grandma’s house (father’s side)
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A photo of my cousin and I in my Dad’s ‘Pizza by Design’ pizza shop in Boston.

 

 

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